Gyoza Recipe

Looking for something different or rather exactly the same? Let’s try this Japanese gyoza that binds the worlds into fame!

Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

“When God closes a door, he opens a window, but it’s up to us to find it.”

or so the saying goes but it seems that not everybody is keen on discovering that window.

Especially not when through an open window not only good but bad things can come in too.

If we are to accept the good as the will of God, then shall we not receive the evil as the will of God? Job 2:10

It seems like back in the old days, Japanese were very well versed in the ways of Christianity, or at least more than many so called themselves Christian today, hence took some precautions to prevent it’s spreading across their country.

It wasn’t because they didn’t want kami to be swapped with God but rather for a more mundane earthly reason of not wanting Spaniards and Portuguese taking over their country culturally and more importantly economically as it was the case with the whole Philippines, Mexico or in fact all South America.

Once the high seas have opened up for exploration so kings, queens and bishops realized, there were land, riches and souls to be added under their influence, they didn’t hesitate much.

Soon after the discovery of the Americas, the whole continent was divided, colonized, and baptized as much as it was possible. Keen to go further, Spaniards soon arrived at the Philippines from Mexico too and quickly added the islands to their collection as well.

Afraid that similar fate may befalls on them, the Japanese decided not to welcome foreign visitors when they saw Christianity spreading across their country. The ruling Tokugawa shogunate introduced new measures to severely limit foreign trade. they barred foreigners to enter the country and discouraged commoners to return, once left, with the threat of death.

The era, today known as the Edo era, from the name of the Capital, lasted 264 years. It ended with the USA convincing the Japanese government to open up the country for Western trade with a fleet of warships and state of the art artillery that became known as the Black Ships.

Once the Japanese were on the international podium again, trade started to flow and Japan slowly opened up. The world could have a peak into its society developed during the so called Sakoku era that influence is still strongly felt across Japanese culture today.

Thanks to commoners not being killed if they wished to return to the country new ways of life, ideas and more importantly recipes could make their way into Japan too. This is how they could get really into parfait, egg rolls but interestingly, this is not quite how they got into gyoza now.

“Let the good in me connect with the good in others, until all the world is transformed through the compelling power of low.”

Gyoza is a fairly recent addition to Japan’s culinary scene. After the Second World War, the returning soldiers brought back the recipes for the Chinese Jiaozi which quickly became popular.

The main difference, if any at all, between Chinese style jiaozi and Japanese gyoza is the rich garlic flavor of the gyoza and thinness of gyoza wrappers due to the use of machine-made wrappers.

But this distinction can’t be applied universally since China’s jiaozi traditions are as far and wide as China itself. We can find many places where jiaozi is thin and garlicy, just like gyoza. Not to mention that if gyoza is made by hand then it will be just as thick as handmade jiaozi.

Jiaozi are served with a dipping sauce that may include vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, ginger, rice wine, hot sauce, and sesame oil while gyozas are humbler in the sense that they only require soy sauce and rice vinegar-based sauce to be dipped in.

Luckily though, we aren’t chained to neither sauce nor filling to be strictly followed if we don’t want to and we can wander far and wide not just in Chinese or Japanese culinary lands but enjoy all the world around us or more importantly inside our Gyozas.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

 

Ingredients

  • 1 pack of Gyoza (about 50)
  • 3 cups / 200g Cabbage (finely sliced)
  • 1 piece / 10g Ginger (peeled, grated)
  • 1 clove / 3g Garlic (grated)
  • 1 lb / 500g Ground pork
  • 2 teaspoons / 10g Salt
  • 1 tablespoon / 15ml Soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon / 15ml Sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons / 30ml Cooking oil (for frying)
  • Basic dipping sauce
    • 3 tablespoons / 50ml Soy sauce
    • 1 teaspoon / 5ml Rice vinegar
    • 1 tablespoon / 15ml Cooking oil
    • Hot sauce to taste

How to make Gyoza

Gyoza Wrap

  1. We can make wrappers by kneading two parts of flour to one part of water. Roll the dough out thinly and cut them with a cookie cutter. Or we can simply buy them in any Asian shop, sometimes under the name of Jaozi.

Filling

  1. Finely slice the cabbage. Peel and grate ginger and garlic.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  2. In a bowl, add cabbage, ground pork, salt soy sauce and sesame seed oil. Mix together the ingredients by hand until well combined.Finely-cut-cabbage-ground-pork-mix-gp-SunCakeMom.jpg

Assembly

  1. Take a slice of gyoza into the non dominant hand. Dip a finger into cold water and run it round the edge of the wrap so it will stick together when folded.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  2. Place about two tablespoons filling into the middle of the wrap.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  3. Pinch the two opposing sides together in the middle.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  4. Start making a pleat by folding the dough under itself. Make one side first.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  5. Then pop over the other side too. Fold about 3 pleat on each side.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  6. Once both sides are done, make sure the dough sticks together nicely.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  7. They tend to stick down at the bottom and dry out at the top so don’t keep them waiting too long for the frying pan. Place them onto a lightly floured surface and spread a kitchen towel over them that slows down moisture evaporation if needed.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

Frying

  1. In our favorite skillet, heat oil to medium to high heat and place the gyozas flat side down.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  2. Fry until the bottom gets golden brown, for about 2 minutes.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  3. Pour a ⅓ cup / 75ml water in the skillet. Place the lid on! Using a lid is paramount!Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  4. Steam cook the gyoza until the water evaporates and the skin gets a rubbery cooked pasta like texture, for about 6 minutes. Remove the gyozas from the skillet. Shake together some basic dipping sauce and serve.Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

Enjoy!Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

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5 from 1 vote

Gyoza Recipe

Looking for something different or rather exactly the same? Let's try this Japanese gyoza that binds the worlds into fame!
Course Appetizer, Main Course, Meal, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine Chinese, Japanese, Sugar free recipe
Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 50
Calories 33kcal
Author SunCakeMom

Ingredients

  • 1 pack of Gyoza about 50
  • 3 cups Cabbage finely sliced
  • 1 piece Ginger peeled, grated
  • 1 clove Garlic grated
  • 1 lb Ground pork
  • 2 teaspoons Salt
  • 1 tablespoon Soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons Cooking oil for frying

Instructions

Filling

  • Finely slice the cabbage. Peel and grate ginger and garlic.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • In a bowl, add cabbage, ground pork, salt soy sauce and sesame seed oil. Mix together the ingredients by hand until well combined.
    Finely-cut-cabbage-ground-pork-mix-gp-SunCakeMom.jpg

Assembly

  • Take a slice of gyoza into the non dominant hand. Dip a finger into cold water and run it round the edge of the wrap so it will stick together when folded.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Place about two tablespoons filling into the middle of the wrap.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Pinch the two opposing sides together in the middle.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Start making a pleat by folding the dough under itself. Make one side first.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Then pop over the other side too. Fold about 3 pleat on each side.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Once both sides are done, make sure the dough sticks together nicely.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • They tend to stick down at the bottom and dry out at the top so don't keep them waiting too long for the frying pan. Place them onto a lightly floured surface and spread a kitchen towel over them that slows down moisture evaporation if needed.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

Frying

  • In our favorite skillet, heat oil to medium to high heat and place the gyozas flat side down.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Fry until the bottom gets golden brown, for about 2 minutes.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Pour a ⅓ cup / 75ml water in the skillet. Place the lid on! Using a lid is paramount!
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom
  • Steam cook the gyoza until the water evaporates and the skin gets a rubbery cooked pasta like texture, for about 6 minutes. Remove the gyozas from the skillet. Shake together some basic dipping sauce and serve.
    Gyoza recipe - SunCakeMom

Notes

Enjoy!

Nutrition (per serving)

Calories: 33kcal (2%) | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 2g (4%) | Fat: 3g (5%) | Saturated Fat: 1g (6%) | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 7mg (2%) | Sodium: 120mg (5%) | Potassium: 35mg (1%) | Fiber: 1g (4%) | Sugar: 1g (1%) | Vitamin A: 5IU | Vitamin C: 2mg (2%) | Calcium: 3mg | Iron: 1mg (6%)

 

Pin now, Enjoy late!

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